Effective Clubs

This article will describe challenges you will face as you run your school club, and it also gives you advice on having the best club possible! I hope these tips are helpful to you.

Here are a few challenges that you will face:

You might have a very, very small club.

When I started my club, not enough people joined. Though we had about thirty people in our Facebook group, and fifty people on the email list, less than five people showed up at each meeting.

At the beginning, I was very upset about this. But then I realized that I didn’t need a huge club in order to make a difference. I only needed one other person. Of course, if I had more people, then events like taste testings, bake sales, potlucks, and club discussions would have been easier and better. But with only a 1-5 active members, we still got a lot of things done. We talked to our school’s cafeteria to get more vegan options, started a garden, sponsored a rescued farm animal, put up posters, did some taste testings, and other great things.

Of course, advertise your club throughout the school to get more members. But if only few people come, that’s okay too.

Finally, even if you’re the only member, you can still get things done. If you’re alone, it will feel weird and it will be harder socially. It will be easier to give up if you are the only member. But you will just need to keep at it, and eventually someone else will join.

People will laugh at your posters and taste testings.

Don’t let these reactions discourage you. While some people will be obnoxious and vocal, others are secretly interested.

You are doing the right thing. You are ending tremendous cruelty to animals and the environment. Despite all the laughter, be a welcoming, happy club.

Change will not happen right away.

It takes years for activism to show results. Spread awareness on factory farming and vegetarian eating and wait.

No one will become vegetarian, let alone vegan, if they believe that vegetarians are weirdos, vegetarian food is gross, vegetarians die of protein deficiency, and other myths. Our goal, as activists, is to prove these beliefs wrong. If someone who holds these beliefs eats yummy vegan food, meets a healthy vegan, and learns the reasons behind veganism, they will be more open to changing their diet. As activists, we must be be the happy, healthy, vegan who tells them about veganism and shows them delicious food.

Here’s some more advice:

  • Focus on one or two projects at a time, but do many projects throughout the year.
  • Keep the club both fun and serious.
  • Keep your ideals, but compromise and listen to the opinions of others.
  • Don’t worry about making mistakes. I’m not kidding! The more mistakes you make, the more you learn from your mistakes. I can’t emphasize this enough.

For more advice, join the VegYouth Alliance!

The VegYouth Alliance is an international alliance of school clubs that promote vegetarianism and veganism. The alliance provides advice, support and resources to student activists